Types Of Meditation

There are many different types of meditation techniques that are practiced by people from all walks of life, while holding to the fundamental principles of reflection and quiet thought to bring about a state of rumination. The different types of meditation that are acknowledged worldwide include Transcendental meditation, Spiritual Meditation , Zen meditation, Qi Gong meditation, Mindfulness meditation, Guided Meditation, Focused Meditation and Kundili Meditation

Here are 8 basic types of meditation that I feel are best suited for anyone new to meditation. Once you explore the various meditation styles, you can choose one that suits you best



1. Mindfulness Meditation. The most well-known type of meditation, mindfulness meditation, is about being aware of the sounds and activities happening around you. It’s almost a flow-like type of meditation, because you literally just let your mind be fluid and flow from one thought to the next, not really focusing on one particular thing. For instance, if you live in a noisy city, you don’t have to block out the outside sirens and screaming children, you let your mind be aware of the sounds without becoming too focused.

2. Transcendental Meditation is a simplified practice that emerges from Vedanta, the meditative tradition within Hinduism. In TM, you sit with your back straight (ideally in the Lotus or half-Lotus posture), and use a mantra, a sacred word that is repeated. According to Transcendental Mediation teachings this mantra is individual to the student and can be given only by a qualified teacher . However, there are web sites revealing all the TM mantras, which appear to be allotted by means of a simple formula based on the age and sex of the student.



3. Guided Meditation. In these meditations, either live or recorded, one is voice-guided step-by-step through a meditative experience. All forms of meditation can be guided, and many are often practiced with recorded or in-person guidance at first.

There are many different approaches to guided meditation, and they have different purposes. Some have a very specific purpose, such as healing or self-improvement with goals such as creating prosperity, improving relationships, developing forgiveness or any number of other goals. Other guided meditations are more general, aimed at quieting the mind and producing calmness and relaxation. Some are designed to evoke “higher states of consciousness” or to enliven various aspects of the human energy field (for example, various “chakra” meditations).

Many guided meditations use imagery, either describing very specific images which produce certain experiences, or inviting the listener to allow their own images to appear. Others may be body-focused, for example an instruction in progressive relaxation, or there may be instructions with regard to the use of the breath.



4. Zen meditation. This is the practice of sitting in preparation of relaxing the body and mind as well as opening oneself up to discovering insight into the nature of your being. In effect this means that as you sit in the various positions prescribed, closing your mind to thought and images; you will notice after a period of time, your heart rate will begin to slow down. Breathing will become shallow, and you will pass into a meditative state. Thought will become isolated and deliberate concentration on the present moment is all you will be aware of. Any thoughts of the past and the future will be kept at bay thus focusing and reacting to what is happening in the now. There will be no rumination on the things you should have done or the things that still need to be done. This will result in a wonderful escape from the constant chatter of the subconscious mind.



5. Qi gong is a form of Taoist meditation that uses the breath to circulate energy through the organs and energy centers of the body in a oval pattern called the ‘microcosmic orbit’. Attention is focused on the breath and the circulation of energy (called ‘qi’ or ‘chi’). Attention is also focused on the three major centers used in Taoist meditation: a point about two inches below the navel, the center of the chest, and the center of the forehead. Qi gong uses the breath to direct energy, and circulate energy in the body and spirit, but it is not heart-based. There is little sense of how the heart changes and develops, and no connection between the circulation of energy and emotional states, and no core set of teachings on how to work with emotion.



6. Spiritual Meditation. This type of meditation is for those who regularly participate in prayer, as it’s based on communicating with God When we slow down, unplug from the frenetic energy of the outer world and focus within, we experience God within us, our true Home of Light, love, wellbeing, joy and peace. We discover the Truth of who we really are – Pure Spirit, One with God – when we let go of the past and future and relax into the present moment. – One of the best ways I know to initiate this process of awakening to the Truth of who we are is to let go into the stillness of deep spiritual meditation.



7. Focused Meditation. If the idea of clearing your mind of all thoughts stresses you out, focused meditation is great because you can focus on a sound, object, mantra, or thought. The key here is to just focus on one of these things and stay committed to that one thought or object. This is when relaxation music comes in handy. Even though you’re essentially using your mind, you’ll be amazed at how rejuvenated you feel afterwards. In our day to day lives, our minds really are in 10 different places at once!



8. Kundalini is another practice that comes from Vedanta. Kundalini is the name for the rising stream of energy that exists in a human being (there is also a downward stream, not emphasized in Kundalini). The aim of Kundalini meditation is to become aware of that rising stream, and to ride the stream to infinity. The practitioner concentrates on their breath flowing through each of the energy centers of the body, always moving upward, toward the energy center just above the top of the head. Kundalini makes active use of the breath, using breath to move energy upward.